For the eighth time this summer, Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon has been shut down.

Interstate 70 Closed Again Through Glenwood Canyon

The interstate was initially closed just before 9:00pm Tuesday because of a flash flood warning for the Grizzly Creek burn scar area. In a post updated at 11:00pm, the Colorado Department of Transportation said crews were monitoring and assessing several mudslides on the roadway caused by afternoon and evening rain. There were reports of mud and rocks on the road near the Grizzly Creek burn scar. CDOT said safety is the "top priority" and crews would begin to clean up once it was safe to do so. As of 4:20 this morning, the interstate was still closed.

No Estimated Time Of Reopening

CDOT did not give an estimated time for reopening the canyon, though it seems likely it will reopen at some point this morning. However, showers and thunderstorms are likely later today in the Glenwood Springs area which could potentially prompt another safety closure for Glenwood Canyon.

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Detours In Place

Motorists needing to get past Glenwood Canyon are advised to take the northern detour route from RIfle, north on CO-13 to EB 40 and then south on CO-9 to Silverthorn. Westbound motorists should exit at Silverthorn and use the same route back to Rifle.

Train Service Not Affected

For those wondering about Amtrak service through the canyon, there's good news. Amtrak service has not been affected by the mudslides and closures because the track is on the opposite of the road from the Grizzly Creek burn scar where the mudslides are happening.

For the latest updates on the status of I-70 go to cotrip.org.

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