Ask any Coloradan about the zoos they've been to across the state and they'll likely mention the Denver Zoo, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, or maybe even the Pueblo Zoo. However, a business that likened itself to a zoo of sorts is much lesser-known and is set to go out of business in the near future.

Colorado Petting Zoo to Close for Shocking Reasons

The establishment is known as SeaQuest, a national chain with one location in the Denver suburb of Littleton, Colorado. However, this particular location will not be around for much longer as they recently announced the establishment's closure via Facebook.

Why is this Colorado Petting Zoo Going Out of Business?

Since opening its location in Littleton in 2018, SeaQuest has been the subject of controversy involving animal abuse.

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What sets SeaQuest apart from traditional zoos is the fact that much of the focus of the business is on handling, meaning visitors can physically interact with the animals by touching or petting them.

However, the types of animals inside SeaQuest aren't your typical pets like dogs and cats, but rather wild animals such as fish, stingrays, iguanas, birds, and hedgehogs, to name a few.

Because of the way SeaQuest operates, PETA has pushed for the stores to close shop with claims of animal abuse. In addition, the Littleton location has seen numerous customers get bit by animals such as iguanas, fish, and pigs.

The company will shut down its Littleton, Colorado location for good on Sunday, February 4, 2024.

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